9th International Conference on Work and Learning - Singapore 2015

Having been to three of these conferences (Denmark, China, Scotland), I can highly recommend it. The atmosphere is very welcoming for postgraduate students! Here are the official details:

The Institute for Adult Learning (IAL) is excited to host the 9th International Conference on Researching Work and Learning (RWL9) in December 2015, in partnership with the National Institute of Education (NIE), Nanyang Technological University (NTU) and SIM University (UniSIM).

Part of a conference series started in 1999 by scholars at the University of Leeds (UK) to bring together researchers and professionals to share insights on leading edge research in work and learning, the conference provides opportunities for researchers to share their work and engage in critical dialogue with scholars and experts from all over the world to extend and deepen our knowledge in these areas.

Convened every two years, the conference sought to recognise the multi-disciplinary character of this research area by actively promoting involvement across scholarly disciplines including but not limited to Adult Education, Labour Education, Higher Education, Vocational Education, Human Resource Management, Business Studies, as well as the full range of human sciences scholarship where matters of both work and learning are considered. In conjunction with the conference, the Journal of Workplace Learning produces a special double issue of leading papers from the conference, edited by local conference organisers with the help and support of the conference’s International Advisory Council. The last conference was held at the University of Stirling in 2013 and the first Asian city to host the conference was Shanghai in 2011.

At the 9th conference in Singapore, we will explore the theme, “Work and Learning in the era of Globalisation: Challenges for the 21st Century”. In Singapore, as in other parts of Asia and the world, the impact of globalisation has resulted in a focus on productivity, skills and performance resulting in particularly rapid changes in work, and attention to what these changes mean for learning for those in work or finding work. This leads us to pose the following questions:

  1. How does globalisation mediate skills, performance and work?
  2. What are the implications of the changing nature of work for learning through work?
  3. In what ways can Vocational Education and Training policies and systems be responsive to the changing nature of work and global and regional pressures?

A call for individual papers, symposiums and poster presentations will be made in February 2015. This is an excellent opportunity for researchers, scholars and experts to share their research and exchange insights on mutual areas of interest.

 

Discussion topics: 

CR&DALL Themes: